Results of a comprehensive analysis of exercise and its protective role for high-risk breast cancer patients show that women who exercise not only live longer, but also are more likely to remain cancer-free after their treatment. What’s more, the study suggests that even a modest amount of exercise can be beneficial.

“Aiming for as little as two and half hours a week of exercise – the minimum under federal guidelines – can have a big impact for women with high-risk breast cancer,” said study lead Rikki Cannioto, PhD, EdD. “Our research shows that some physical activity is far better, in terms of cancer survival, than no activity at all and it is just as beneficial as longer workouts.”

Cannioto’s study was part of a clinical trial run by SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials network funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and a member of the oldest and largest publicly-funded research network in the nation. Study results are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, and featured in the most recent edition of the NCI’s Cancer Currents blog.



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