Since then, I have seen multiple articles that reflected the winner-take-all, “a few win at the expense of others” rhetoric as an accurate description of competitive markets, sometimes even accepting that its core claim was so well-established that it could be used as a scapegoat for an ever-expanding host of social problems.

However, even if technology has greatly increased the possible leverage or “amplification” of human talents (such as current worldwide markets for entertainers or large international businesses that multiply the economic impacts of superior corporate management), that leverage creates greater benefits for consumers, evidenced by consumers’ shifting of who and what they patronize toward what they consider better. Consequently, even if “star performer” incomes rise sharply compared to others, that doesn’t mean “the one who wins gets it all,” because that overlooks the far larger positive effects on consumers.



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